Canadian Women Film Directors Database
home search browse about contact fran├žais

Quick search by surname

Quote:
"Although Bill executes stunning feats of driving skill in his trusty Maxwell auto, the rescue of the 'Girl' from the 'Bad Hats' is carried out with ludicrous ease. The tables are turned, however, when Bill is gratuitously wounded in the head, and the heroine must navigate them both to safety through the performance of feats of ingenuity, bravery, and skill that are even greater than those of the hero. That this scenario is constructed around consciously ironic varations on genre conventions of the heroine is indicated by Shipman's foregrounding herself as enunciator of Something New: The film opens and closes with scenes of Shipman as 'The Writing Woman' typing out her story on her trusty old Remington."
-- Kay Armatage


Source:
Armatage, Kay. "Sex and Snow: Landscape and Identity in the God's Country Films of Nell Shipman." In American Silent Film: Discovering Marginalized Voices, edited by Gregg Bachman and Thomas J. Slater. Carbondale, IL: Southern Illinois University Press, 2002. (pp. 136-137)